It’s a Bop? DropMix Freestyle Test Mix!

I’m in the process of making a video about a pair of DJ-centric Harmonix games: Fuser and DropMix. Part of that video involves B-roll of me playing the latter.

This was an opportunity to test out a bunch of stuff, from my new weighted base camera rig, to mobile screen capture, to YouTube’s copyright limits. If you’re seeing this post, the video sneaked through! Please don’t snitch!

Anyway, here’s a freestyle mix I whipped up while working on that project. Certainly mot the cleanest run, but it has its moments. If I do come back to DropMix video content, I think it’ll be through rehearsed mixes. Enjoy the beats!


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Hip-Hop Week | Hip-Hop vs. Game Design: How Game Designers Incorporate the Freestyle Elements of Hip-Hop into Hip-Hop Themed Video Games

Hip-Hop Week concludes with this post on In Third Person! For the grand finale, I look at the point where the elements of hip-hop freestyle collide with game structure. Has any game ever found the right balance? Thank you for joining me on this adventure!


The element of improvisation is a foundational block of hip-hop music and culture. In the beginning, the scene started with DJs, rappers, and breakdancers making things up as they went. Though hip-hop music and culture has been mainstream for quite some time, the ethos of what freestyle means still permeates.

Translating that freeform nature of hip-hop has been a challenge in the world of video games. By virtue of being a game, the “game” part needs some sort of quantifiable benchmark to define success. This flies in the face of the freeform nature of the culture.

Let’s look at a few ways in which developers have tried to provide structure for the purposes of making a fun game, while trying to maintain the freestyle nature of the activity its emulating.

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