Why I Treat Playing Video Games and Streaming Video Games on Twitch as Two Different Things

At a certain point in my streaming journey, I made a very important distinction for myself:

Playing video games and streaming are two separate activities.

Making this adjustment has helped me manage managing my mental health while also putting myself in a better position to work towards my streaming goals. Here’s how I differentiate between the two and how I benefit.

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Knockout City Review

Video game dodgeball has existed since the 80s with the likes of Super Dodge Ball. As a whole though, dodgeball is an underutilized concept. Maybe other game designers didn’t want to step on the toes of the Kunio-Kun universe. Maybe they just didn’t have any ideas to expand on the core concept of hitting people in the face with balls.

Enter Knockout City. Taking cues from team deathmatch shooters, Metroid Prime, and…fighting games(?)…this might be the most ambitious dodgeball game yet.

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The Best Mode in Rogue Company is…Dodge Ball?

If you can dodge bullets, you can dodge a ball?

No, there aren’t any actual balls to duck in the Dodge Ball mode found in Rogue Company. But that doesn’t stop this side mode from currently being the best reason to play this free-to-play shooter.

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Knockout City is a very traditional game (with a fairly unique twist)

Underneath the veneer of fantastical dodgeball, Knockout City is a team deathmatch shooter. Players roam around an enclosed space, hitting each other with projectiles to score points.

In practice, Knockout City feels very different from a traditional shooter. Not because you’re hurling dodgeballs instead of firing bullets. Its unique feel is derived from the absence of a core tenet of shooter design: aiming.

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Examples of Twitch and YouTube Streaming Overlay Design Elements That I Really Like

What makes for a good streaming overlay? With streaming as a medium still in its infancy, the answer is rapidly-evolving and highly-subjective. Once upon a time, overlays weren’t a thing. Then we moved into a phase where streamers filled the screen with design elements and widgets. These days, the new wave is a larger camera view within your gameplay scene so that viewers get a better view of the streamer.

Furthermore, overlays aren’t a one-size-fits-all solution. As one example, I greatly prefer the look of streams that put the camera overtop of full-width gameplay. However, that particular presentation style doesn’t work for speed-runners who display their time splits on the side or for retro games that are presented in a 4:3 aspect ratio.

Based on my experiences of watching Twitch and tinkering with my own overlay, here are aspects of overlay design that I like. There are links to every streamer I reference in case you’re interested in checking them out. I’m by no means an expert on overlay design. Just using this post to share design elements that I appreciate!

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My Experiences with Starting a Gaming TikTok

Earlier this year, YouTube launched its Shorts video format. YouTube Shorts are vertically-oriented videos with a browsing mechanism similar to TikTok. Even in this early stage, a number of creators have greatly expanded their reach through this new format.

With YouTube being a priority for me, I decided to start making videos within the Shorts format. I was already making clips for Twitter and Instagram, so making YouTube Shorts was simply a matter of reformatting them for a vertical screen.

As it turns out, that YouTube Shorts vertical format is also same as TikTok. Though I’ve been reluctant to support more platforms with my content, I figured that if I’m going to make vertically-oriented clips for YouTube anyway, why not also post them on TikTok for greater reach with little extra effort?

Thus far, not much has come out of YouTube Shorts. TikTok though

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Tips for Narrating and Commentating on Your Gameplay While Streaming on Twitch or YouTube

Your voice is your most valuable asset as a streamer. No one else in the world sounds exactly like you. No one else has your exact perspective on the world. No one else can share your specific insight on a game or subject. The more you use your voice, the more you will stand out amongst the masses, even if you’re playing the same games as everyone else.

In spite of this power that we all wield, countless streamers under-utilize their voice. They sit silently for minutes at a time, even when some are streaming with the best microphone audio can buy. Considering how first impressions are usually made in seven seconds or less, viewers may be leaving in droves because your silence gives viewers the sense that you’re just another streamer playing a video game with nothing else to offer.

Coming up with stuff to talk about for hours on end is difficult, especially if you’re not the talkative type. Thankfully, there’s a convenient source of material to draw from right in front of your face: the game you’re playing. By narrating and commenting on you’re in-game actions, thought process, and reactions, you’ll almost always have something of value to say. Here are some tips for narrating and commentating like a pro!

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Common Challenges that 0-Viewer Twitch Streamers Face (and Potential Ways of Overcoming Them)

Streaming to zero viewers isn’t something to be ashamed of. Roughly 88% of active streamers have an average concurrent viewership of 0-5 viewers. Many in that group never see viewers at all. It took me about a year of floundering on YouTube, Facebook, and Twitch before finally finding my footing above the 0-viewer threshold.

For those who have ambitions of climbing out of that hole, maybe I can help? Though I certainly don’t have the experience or wisdom to help you become the next Ninja, the experience I do have may be enough to get you past 0-viewer Andy status.

Using the site nobody.live for reference, I decided to watch over 100 0-viewer streams and make note of some common factors that could be holding these streamers back. Here are some common challenges I noted and some potential solutions for overcoming them!

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Years After Launch, Am I Finally Happy With Street Fighter V?

Street Fighter IV still stands as not only my favourite fighting game of all-time, but favourite game across any genre. As we transitioned into Street Fighter V, I had high hopes that the game would match or exceed the heights of its predecessor. It did not.

A disastrous launch botched basically every aspect of the game, from no single-player content, to awful online, excessive button input delay, to fundamentally-flawed combat design. My fandom for the franchise still carried me quite far. I reached a pretty high ranking in online play and even won an IRL tournament before finishing 17th in the Cineplex WorldGaming Street Fighter V National Championships.

Not long after my most successful tournament run ever, I left the game behind. I found myself being overly-frustrated with the game’s faults, as well as my personal struggle to continually improve as a player. Though I’ve dabbled in other fighting games here-and-there, I never found a new game to call home.

Almost on a whim, I picked up Street Fighter V: Champion Edition on PC as a potential first step towards moving all of my future fighting game playing on the platform. Most of my time thus far has been reacquainting myself with the fighting game I left behind long ago. How are things nowadays?

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The Curious Case of Downgraded Performance of Rogue Company on PC By Switching Monitors the Wrong Way

One of the weird quirks I’m still wrestling with when it comes to PC gaming is switching between monitors. Most games by default open on the main monitor, which isn’t actually what I want. The only game I’ve been able to get to open on the right screen by default is Overwatch. Everything else requires some noodling in the settings before I start.

Even so, switching monitors shouldn’t be that big of a deal, right? Unfortunately, the situation proved a bit hairier with Rogue Company.

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