How to Let Viewers Control Your Stream Through Twitch Channel Point Rewards, Bits, Subs, and Chat Commands Using LioranBoard

Create engagement and extend watch time by giving your viewers some control over your stream. Through activities such as subs, Bits, and Channel Points, it’s possible for these events to trigger scene changes, new camera angles, sound effects, animations, or even turn off the stream!

(Watch an example of viewers blasting my air horn on stream!)

Admittedly, initial setup and ongoing configuration can be a pain. However, the effort is worth it, as it unlocks a whole new level of interactivity on your stream. Follow this guide and give the people what they want!

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Recreating My Streaming Studio in Animal Crossing: New Horizons

“What if I built my actual streaming room in Animal Crossing: New Horizons?”

The question hit me fairly early on as I uploaded the image of my Toronto Raptors championship banner that adorns my IRL studio. That night, I uploaded a few more images to give my house the “feel” of my basement, such as Link to match the art that Kris and Rachel from Double Jump gave me for Christmas, my Notorious B.I.G photo, and a picture of my best boy Snorlax.

Finally, I went all the way and built out the whole room.

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Aspects of Streaming That Stress Me Out

As a viewer, streaming looks like it’s all fun and games. Going through the process has taught me that there is a lot to enjoy in front of the camera. Gaming is always a pleasure, but the most satisfying part of the experience comes from making new friends all over the world.

But to gloss over the myriad of stressors involved with the hobby would be a disservice. As a streamer, there are a plethora of potential stressors that can make this pursuit quite the challenge. Every person has their own unique set of triggers, but these are the things I fret over every time I go live.

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5 Mistakes I Made as a Twitch Streamer (And How You Can Avoid Them)

Streaming for the past few years has taught me that it’s basically impossible for one to be a natural streamer. Being good at it requires one to possess skills in a myriad of otherwise-disparate disciplines, from video production, audio production, public speaking, marketing, and more. Furthermore, there’s a bunch of weird skills that you’re not going to develop until you go live. Heck, the actual part where you play video games is but a small part of the discipline.

Because of this, making mistakes is inevitable. Lord knows I’ve made many. It might be embarrassing in the moment, but what’s important are the lessons learned from those experiences and how you recover going forward. Here’s are just a fraction of the mistakes I made and how you can address them faster than I did.

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The Pros and Cons of Becoming a Twitch Affiliate

For many Twitch streamers, attaining Affiliate status is a major milestone. It allows streamers to generate revenue from Twitch’s built-in tools while also acting as status symbol. You don’t have to browse very far in the world of gaming social media to find streamers that prominently display the title in their profiles. Heck, reaching that level was so important to me at one point that I went down a depressive spiral during my quest.

When the invite to join Twitch Affiliate finally came in, I pounced on it. But is that the right move for everyone? Probably not. Though I’m no longer weighed down by the stress of not having Twitch Affiliate, having the status hasn’t magically transformed me into a better or more important creator. It’s also limited my options in a few key ways. Here are some things you should know before you accept the deal.

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I tried streaming on Mixer. Here are my notes.

Wanting to be taken more seriously in the world of streaming, Mixer sent shockwaves throughout the industry by getting the exclusive rights for streaming’s biggest star. The platform still has a lot of work to do before truly becoming a rival to the likes of Twitch and YouTube, but moves like the Ninja signing have gone a long way towards building name recognition. At the very least, when people discuss streaming platforms, Mixer is usually mentioned on that list as an equal.

Recently, I streamed on Mixer as part of a stability test for my ISP. Because I was having issues streaming to Twitch and YouTube, they wanted me to try Mixer in hopes that they could isolate my network issues to something relating to RTMP (Real-Time Messaging Protocol). Twitch and YouTube use RTMP, while Mixer uses their propriety FTL (Faster Than Light) technology. Here are my notes from that experience.

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Why It’s Okay to Quit Streaming (And What You Can Do to Break Through) #BloggersWhoStream

[This post is part of a blogging collaboration by Later Levels and Hundstrasse called #BloggersWhoStream. Make sure to give them both credit and follow the hashtag on Twitter for more posts from the community!]

When it comes to streaming, I value the human connection that can be created during a show above all else. It’s incredible when viewers from around the world come by to talk about mutual interests, partake in healthy debates, share life stories, and provide support for one another. It doesn’t take much for this magic to happen, as some of my most memorable streams involved just one viewer in the chat.

Creating that human connection is difficult when streaming to an empty room. For most, the room is empty more often than not. This is a top-heavy medium where the majority of the audience watches just a handful of creators. It’s so uneven that about 89% of active streamers average less than three viewers a stream.

Furthermore, the top 5,000 streamers garner 74% of all watch time. With over 3,000,000 active streamers per month, that leaves 99.84% of active streamers with only 26% of the watch time pie. This creates an environment where tens of thousands of streamers are broadcasting to zero viewers at any given time. Just with Fortnite alone, sort by streams with the lowest viewer counts first and you’ll unearth thousands of streamers without a viewer.

I’m not immune to this phenomenon. There are times when my viewer counter stays at zero for the duration of a stream. It’s actually an improvement over 2017, where I pretty much went the entire year without anyone noticing me. Even so, the feeling of opening yourself up to the world and no one caring is…one of the most demoralizing experiences I’ve gone through as a creator.

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Get the Best Possible Sound From Your Streaming Microphone in OBS and Streamlabs OBS With These Settings and Tips #BloggersWhoStream

[This post is part of a blogging collaboration by Later Levels and Hundstrasse called #BloggersWhoStream. Make sure to give them both credit and follow the hashtag on Twitter for more posts from the community!]

Having a good mic won’t help your stream if it isn’t configured properly. Particularly if you have a condenser mic, which you probably do if you own a USB mic. Condenser mics – such as the Blue Snowball, Blue Yeti, or the Audio-Technica AT2020 among many others – work best in a controlled studio environment.

Unfortunately, most of us aren’t streaming in professional studios. Without any adjustments, your voice will probably distort when you get loud, be difficult to hear over your gameplay when you speak softly, and pick up weird ambient noises in-and-around your house.

It’s mission critical to address these issues, as your microphone is your primary method of communication and content creation on stream. You can address most of these issues in OBS, Streamlabs OBS, or whatever digital or analog mixer you may use. Follow along with this guide and it should get your microphone audio to a better place!

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