Gaming Decor Patch Notes: Holiday 2019 Edition

‘Tis the season to deck the halls! After failing to do anything festive for Halloween, my wife volunteered to give the game room a holiday makeover. Here are the results!

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3 Elgato Products to Buy This Black Friday

Black Friday is a wonderful time to buy streaming equipment as a gift for the streamer in your life. As part of this year’s festivities, Elgato has a number of its products on sale. They are my go-to company for streaming equipment and I may have to pick up an item or two for myself.

If you want to check out the full list of deals, check out this link and find the deals being offered in your country. But if you want a few of my recos, keep on reading!

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Logitech BRIO 4K Webcam Review

I love my Logitech C920. Considered by many to be the go-to webcam for entry-level streamers, it delivers a lot of bang for your buck. However, its limitations became more obvious with time and knowledge. The camera needs a lot of light in order to squeeze out the most optimal image. Even with my studio lights, the picture still comes out a bit grainy when using my full-screen intermission scene on stream. The camera caps out at 1080p 30fps, which may be a hinderance for streamers or video creators in need of more visual fidelity. Also, when compared to higher-end DSLR cameras, the difference in quality is undeniable.

As much as I would love to upgrade to a DSLR setup, it’s quite the expensive path almost any way you slice it. Between the DSLR camera itself, an Elgato Cam Link or an equivalent signal adapter, a wall adapter for the camera, and a tripod or other mounting solution, the cost is orders of magnitude above any webcam. Add in additional lenses, and the sticker shock stings even more. Despite my desire to improve my image quality, I can’t justify spending upwards of $1,000 on a complete DSLR rig at this point in my streaming career.

By happenstance, I got the opportunity to test out the Logitech BRIO 4K Webcam. It became immediately apparent that this is the middle step I’ve been looking for.


The BRIO is Logitech’s most premium webcam to-date. At its ceiling, it can capture footage at a 4K resolution and at 30 frames per second. It can also do 1080p at 60 fps; something that the C920 is incapable of doing. Housed in a casing that’s a bit larger than a C920, it can still clip comfortably on most monitors. This one also features a detachable USB 3.0 cable, making it a bit easier to move or stow away.

At more than double the price, it’s almost a given that the BRIO would be better than a C920. But how much better? I put the two cameras to the test.

The first test I did was a direct side-by-side comparison. Both cameras are in 1080p, using default settings, and with the same lighting. Immediately, the difference is staggering. My C920 looks washed out, while the BRIO provides colour that is more vibrant and accurate.

After that, I did a test of the two cameras at full-width, flipping between the two. Again, the C920 looks incredibly washed out compared to the BRIO. Also, you can see more of the details in view, such as the details in my face and how I’m using black duct tape to hold my busted headset together. In retrospect, you could always see the tape, but it’s even more apparent with the BRIO. Note to self: get new headphones.

One more test between the two cameras. This time, it’s in my 720p streaming layout with all of the same colour correction settings. There were no noticeable differences in CPU performance, and the BRIO is still a cut above. However, the colour correction settings I use for the C920 make the BRIO look a bit more yellow than I would like. Nothing that I couldn’t adjust for next time.

The Logitech BRIO is a cut above the C920 and could very well could be the best webcam on the market. I love the way it outputs video while also supporting 1080p 60 fps. It’s going to look great on my stream and even better if/when I finally get around to creating original content for YouTube. Right after the testing was over, I purchased one for myself.

Even though I jumped at the first opportunity to grab this camera, the BRIO won’t be for everyone. For those just starting out, the Logitech C920 is still the best place to start. The image quality is good enough with some colour correction and it won’t hurt your bank account too much if fall out of streaming. If you’ve got the funds and the reasoning to justify a full DSLR rig, the BRIO can’t match that in terms of image quality or flexibility. But if you need a middle step with improved image quality without the hefty expenses of a high-end camera rig, the BRIO is a great option.


Buy the Logitech Brio Now From Amazon.com

[Purchasing through this Amazon affiliate link gives me a small commission without adding any extra cost or effort to you. Thanks for your support!]

The Process Behind Running My Stream

Developing my streaming process has been…a process. For a long time, I failed to see the forest through the trees. Trying to squeeze the most performance out of my underpowered hardware, I spent too much time figuring out how to present a technically-competent stream and not enough time thinking about everything else that goes into it. Didn’t have a plan to promote my stream. Didn’t think about what type of content I wanted to create once I got things working. Didn’t even think about why I was doing this in the first place beyond seeing whether I could do it at all.

My aimlessness came back to haunt me when I came up just short of reaching Twitch Affiliate status. Even though it wasn’t a goal I was actively targeting, missing the mark forced me to really think about what I wanted and the steps required to get there. Streaming is still a struggle, but having a better handle on my goals has really helped me define my approach to this demanding hobby.

As of now, this is the process I go through to make each stream happen.

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From Affiliates now earning ad revenue to the new Creator Dashboard, let’s look at some of the new and upcoming features on Twitch

At the end of September, Twitch unveiled a host of new features coming to the platform in the coming year. There’s a lot of exciting stuff for viewers and creators to enjoy! This post won’t cover all of the announcements, but I wanted to cover the things that I found the most interesting. Let’s go!

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8 Tips for Participating in Extra Life

On Saturday, November 2nd, many will be participating in the Extra Life 25-hour gaming marathon in support of the Children’s Miracle Network of Hospitals. Our group had an amazing time participating in the program and can’t wait to do it again on November 2nd at 9am EST. If you’ve ever considered participating, or are in the midst of preparing for your big Extra Life event, maybe these tips will come in handy!

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Gaming Decor Patch Notes: October 2019 Edition

The month of Halloween is here and…I’ve done nothing festive with my backdrop. Missed opportunity? Perhaps. Nevertheless, it’s time to run through a few new editions to the gaming room!

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10 Years of In Third Person: Some of My Favourite Posts

Having created almost 3,000 posts (!) in the last decade, there’s probably way more content here that I’ve forgotten than I’ve remembered. Though I highly recommend going back to the very beginning and reading everything in chronological order, you could also use this handy list of a few of my favourites!

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Navigating the World of Streaming Advice

Being a streamer can be a really demanding hobby. If you have aspirations of honing your craft and building an audience, it requires you to be a content creator, video producer, audio technician, on-camera personality, graphic designer, social media manager, and more. Actually playing games is but a small – though still notable – part of the process.

Personally, I wasn’t born with all of the skills required to be a natural. It’s taken so much work just to get to where I am now, which is still a ways away from where I want to go. If anything, the amount of stuff I’m trying to improve on is longer and more specific now than it was then.

With so many questions in need of answering, I usually turn to the internet. However, not all information online is created equal. There are times when I have questions so specific that I can’t find any pre-existing answers online. At least one piece of advice borked my computer bad enough that I had to run a system restore to reverse the damage. Have also started to see questionable sources charging exorbitant amounts of money for streaming advice that’s sub-par or a downright scam. How does one find the the answers they need in the “Wild West” era of streaming knowledge?

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Streaming and The Journey vs. The Destination

A while back, I was perusing r/twitch on Reddit when I stumbled on a thread from a user who was struggling to rebuild the audience he once had after taking an eight-month hiatus. At the time, the thread only had one response, but it strongly resonated with me while summarizing the biggest lesson I’ve learned as a streamer.

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