Some Twitch Stats to Put Your Streaming Ambitions Into Perspective

So you want to be the next big streamer. You saw Ninja make millions by playing video games on Twitch and want to do the same. Totally understandable.

How feasible is it to actually turn your gaming hobby into a streaming career?¬†Though I am far from a Twitch expert – particularly when it comes to growth – there are tidbits of knowledge I’ve picked up from my personal experience, from streaming gurus, and from publicly available data on sights like Twitch Tracker and Sully Gnome.

In this post, let’s focus on the hard data. When I think about the realities of growing my channel on Twitch, these particular factoids go a long way to put things into perspective for me. Hope they do the same for you on your journey!

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10 Years of In Third Person: Strength in Numbers?

This is my car, circa 2011. I took this picture of it before driving it off the lot for the first time. Not long after, I wrote a post about it. It’s not gaming-related, but buying my first brand new car was an event worth celebrating however I wanted.

What happened after that was…unexpected.

Not long after posting, traffic to that post took off. So much so, that it’s still one of my most most popular posts. On one hand, it droves me nuts that this one off-topic post took off, while so many of the gaming posts that I care a lot more about are more deserving of the eyeballs in my opinion. However, it also served a teachable moment with regards to what the numbers can (and can’t) tell you.

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Twitch, the Road to Affiliate, and Losing Myself in the Chase for Numbers

Numbers are great. They help us quantify what we have and what we aim to achieve. But numbers aren’t everything.

When In Third Person launched a decade ago, I made it a point to not use numbers as the primary measure of success. Part of that was out of necessity. It’s easy to fret over pageviews when you don’t generate any.

But more importantly, this is a creative medium where the success that comes from the work one creates isn’t entirely defined by pageviews, clicks, or ad revenue. Factors such as (but not limited to) the quality of the work, the satisfaction felt from releasing those ideas out into the world, and the impact the work has on others are some of the intangible things that can mean a whole lot. Whatever that quantitative and qualitative mix is, success is usually a balance.

Finding that balance is difficult. It always changes from day-to-day, from one piece of creative work to the next, to whatever mood you happen to be in at the time. In recent months, I lost hold of the balance while chasing a particular streaming goal. I’m on the precipice of finally reaching that goal, but I’m not proud of how I lost myself along the way.

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Breaking Down In Third Person’s 2015 Website Stats

Part of my job in real life is to analyze website data. Pouring through the numbers, I gather insights and make recommendations on how our clients should proceed. When it comes to this site, I peek at the numbers daily, though the amount of analysis that can be done though the wordpress.com suite of analytics has been pretty limited.

Recently, they rolled out the ability to export post data into CSV files. I did that, added an assortment of metatags, and start splicing up the numbers into interesting chucks. Let’s take a peek together at what’s happening under the hood of In Third Person!

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About You: Current Hot Topics On In Third Person

Ever since I wrote the Top 5 All-Time Most Viewed In Third Person Posts post, I’ve been kind of a metrics junkie. I’ll frequently log in with the sole intention of viewing the numbers and picking out the trends. I don’t envision a day where I’ll ever give away all my numbers to you, but I think it could be a neat exercise to talk about how you, the readers, use In Third Person. I’ve already covered the Top 5 Most Viewed In Third Person Posts of All-Time and now, I want to talk about the three topics that In Third Person readers can’t get enough of within the last month or so.

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