Shut Up and Make Stuff: Overcoming Failure and Anxiety in Order to Create Freely

The In Third Person YouTube channel has been around for almost a decade. In that time, I’ve uploaded almost 1,000 videos. Some of my videos have been viewed thousands of times. There are a few pieces of content on there that I’m really proud of. Even so, I look at my overall effort there as my biggest failure as a creator.

There are numerous reasons for me being unhappy with it in its current state. I’ve spent years in my own head analyzing my mistakes and beating myself up for letting things get to this point. I’ve learned a lot based on my own experiences and through external sources on what it takes. Now isn’t the time to sit back and reflect anymore. It’s time to work.

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Content Creation and Load Management

One of the trendiest phrases in NBA jargon is “load management”. This is the practice of forcing healthy players to sit out regular season games as a means of keeping them fresh for the playoffs. Though its a touchy subject – as it devalues the NBA season while robbing paying fans of their opportunities to see the best players at times – we’re starting to see the potential benefits in this strategy. Case in point: Kawhi Leonard on the Toronto Raptors this past season.

Coming off the previous season where he only played 9 out of a possible 82 games due to injury, the Toronto Raptors put Kawhi on an aggressive load management program to keep him fresh. Instead of playing all 82 games, he played about 60, while skipping at least one of two games that were scheduled on consecutive days. Kawhi might have been visibly limping by the end of this past season, but he had enough gas in the tank to lead the Raptors to their first ever NBA championship. Though we’ll never know for certain, there’s a chance his body would have broken down prematurely had he played the season in full.

While I am not a superstar basketball player, applying the concept of load management to the way I manage In Third Person may not be a bad idea.

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Video Games as a Coping Mechanism

What started out as a retro game show-and-tell takes a turn when we begin talking about how we used video games in the past as an unhealthy means of dealing with stress, depression, and anxiety. Video games can be a positive coping mechanism, but in these particular cases, they weren’t. We then talk about our career anxieties today.

It’s a topic I’ve touched on before, but it was a very therapeutic chat with Muligoon. If you’re going through anything, please know that you’re not alone. There are people out there willing to help, whether it’s family, friends, or medical professionals. Don’t be afraid to reach out for help!