Top 5 In Third Person Posts – April 2011 Edition

April 2011 was quite the month for hot gaming topics. On the news front, Sony and Nintendo dominated discussion around the Internet, as PSN was shut down for over a week due to hackers and Nintendo officially revealed their plans for a new home console in 2012. As for the games, any month featuring Portal 2 and the new Mortal Kombat is a good month in my books.

In spite of April’s hot topics, none of my posts regarding those topics made this month’s top 5 In Third Person posts. If those didn’t garner the most traffic, then what did?

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Top 5 In Third Person Posts: March 2011 Edition

 

March was a pretty big month for gaming. While the biggest news came from the North American release of the Nintendo 3DS, In Third Person talked almost exclusively about Marvel vs. Capcom 3. I’m sorry if the subject matter of my posts of late have been narrow, but I haven’t really been playing much else of late. Damn that game is good.

Based on the numbers, I’m not alone in my interest in Marvel vs. Capcom 3. Many of my Marvel vs. Capcom 3 posts got a lot of traffic, some of which found their way onto this list. If you’re interested in seeing what the readers found hot in March, click through the break!

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Top 5 In Third Person Posts: February 2011 Edition

 

I hope your month of love was a good one. Despite me having to dial down the daily content (and the time I spend gaming) due to real life, it’s still awesome to see so many people hit this site on a monthly basis. I’ll still keep writing as often as possible.

This month’s top 5 posts are an interesting mix of evergreen posts that never seem to go away and older posts finding new life due to current events. Click through to see what was the hotness in February.

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Using ‘Cost Per Hour’ to Determine the Value of a Game

cost-per-hour

Over the past few years of following podcasts, message boards and reviews, there seems to be this weird metric that creeps into discussions in one way or another. For the purposes of this post, I will refer to it as ‘cost per hour’. It’s a metric that people directly or indirectly use to judge a game’s value based on how much it costs and how long the experience is. I will express it with the following formula:

Value = Cost of Game/Number of Hours Played

In a perfect world, where money directly translates into valuable experiences, these types of metrics could work as a means of judging a game’s value. However, this logic is flawed, because neither cost or value variables are consistent. You can’t make a blanket statement saying that Limbo is too expensive at $15 dollars because it’s only a 3-hour experience, because it might go on sale, someone may take longer/shorter to beat it, and subjective opinion may say that their time with it was totally worth that price.

The price you pay for that experience and the length of that experience are viable factors in determining a game’s value, but not the whole picture. However, what if we did take away all of the other factors? Is it possible to come up with a consensus cost per hour rate to determine whether or not a game is worth it? I take a few examples from my collection and crunch the numbers to find out.

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How I Gave Up On Fight Night Round 4

I loved Fight Night Round 4. I loved how the gameplay engine was tweaked so that the game played and moved a lot more realistically. While it wasn’t perfect (in particular all of the menu-based stuff was borderline maddening), it’s easily the best boxing video game around and I enjoyed it greatly.So why did I furiously trade it in after owning it for only two weeks? Continue reading