Pandemic Review – Nintendo Switch Version

In the world of tabletop gaming, Pandemic is a modern classic. Throwing two-to-four players into a world where four deadly viruses are on the verge of destroying humanity, you must work as a team to contain the spread while developing cures before it’s too late. Yes, the game is incredibly stressful, but there’s a magic that comes with working as a team and leveraging each character’s unique abilities in order to overcome this challenge.

Just like the viruses you’re trying to eradicate, the hit board game has spread to the Nintendo Switch? Is this version a plague on the console? Or a cure for your digital tabletop fever?

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Mystery Date: Catfished Review

From Monopoly: Millennial Edition to Game of Life: Quarter Life Crisis, Hasbro has been updating its classic board games with parody versions meant to appeal to young adults in modern times. One game in the series that I couldn’t pass up was Mystery Date: Catfished. Putting an online dating spin to the legacy title, will you swipe right on your future soulmate?

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10 Years of In Third Person: Some of My Favourite Posts

Having created almost 3,000 posts (!) in the last decade, there’s probably way more content here that I’ve forgotten than I’ve remembered. Though I highly recommend going back to the very beginning and reading everything in chronological order, you could also use this handy list of a few of my favourites!

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My DropMix Wish List

The last thing I need to aid in my crippling addiction of buying every DropMix expansion in sight is more DropMix cards. Yet here we are. Due to the additive nature of the game, I had to make a wish list, right?

I went through the not-so-scientific process of scrolling through my Spotify for the first five songs that I thought would be great DropMix songs. Keep in mind that while I want to hear songs I genuinely like, I’m also asking for songs that I think would work within the game’s framework of breaking songs down to their individual instruments and matching those with instruments from other songs. Here’s list one of probably many to come!

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Fireball Island: The Curse of Vul-Kar Review Review

During my childhood, the original Fireball Island board game made quite the impression on me. Unlike many games of its time, this one was played on a 3D board, complete with pathways, hills, rickety bridges, and an ominous fireball-shooting mountain at the top. You could steal treasure from other players by passing them on the board. Of course, there was also the fireballs. Strategically positioned on the map, you could send one crashing into your rivals, knocking them down while causing them to drop their treasure. This level of adventure and treachery was beyond cool at the time.

Though the original has been long out of print, the game returns as a modern remaster from Restoration Games. Fireball Island: The Curse of Vul-Kar certainly looks the part when you set it all up, but does it maintain the essence of the original while making the game play well for modern times?

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The Networks Review

The Networks by Gil Hova and Formal Ferret Games is a worker placement board game built around the novel concept of running your own television network. Over the course of five seasons, you’ll battle competing cable networks for the most viewers by adding new shows, hiring stars, and landing ad deals. On top of all that, there’s no room for complacency, as audiences grow tired of shows over time, forcing you to constantly keep your lineup fresh.

Its elevator pitch is one of the most compelling I’ve seen for a board game in quite some time, even as someone who doesn’t like watching television. But how well does its theme translate to the tabletop?
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Ticket to Ride: New York Review

The original Ticket to Ride is my all-time favourite board game. I really enjoy that game’s balance of accessibility and strategic depth. Over the course of play, there’s a lot of interesting decisions to make, from determining which colour cards to draw, to knowing when to place your trains on the board, to finding alternate paths to your destination when a jerk has blocked your path. In spite of my love for that first game, I haven’t really ventured much beyond it. I have the 1910 Expansion, and I’ve played Ticket to Ride: Europe a few times, but that’s it. Based on what I’ve seen of the other standalone games and expansions, there wasn’t enough new or unique there for me to venture beyond my comfort zone.

Enter Ticket to Ride: New York. The latest entry in the series is also the smallest. With a playing field that only covers the south side of Manhattan, this iteration of the game is meant to deliver the thrills of the original in a package that can be played in about 15 minutes. I love the idea of having a quick version of Ticket to Ride to play, but does anything get lost in the distillation process?

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Obstacles That Arise When Making Board Game Related Video Content

There was a time in early 2017 where I started a video show about board games. “Cleverly” titled Board Game Talk, it was an opportunity to try a new style of content creation while being able to share my thoughts on a medium I love. I’m glad to have given it a shot, and some of the videos would actually go on to perform pretty well by my standards.

By the end of season one though, I knew I wasn’t ready to go further. Though I do have a desire to someday come back to this concept, I’ll need to overcome these hurdles in order to make the content I want at a level I’m happy with.

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Disney Villainous Board Game Review

The villain never wins in a Disney film, but one of them will finally get to achieve their dastardly goal in the Villainous board game. With each player taking control of a Disney villain within their respective realms, the race is on to see who can complete their vile objective first. Are you a bad enough evildoer to defeat the heroes that stand in your way while also overcoming the interference from other villains trying to finish their schemes?

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No Online Play for Asmodee Games on Nintendo Switch is a Deal-Breaker

Lost in the midst of the Super Smash Bros. Ultimate hype, Asmodee released the first of their digital board games to the Nintendo eShop. While I have not played Carcassonne on the Nintendo Switch, the physical board game is one of my faves, and the iOS port is stellar. I’m confident that the core gameplay is intact.

However, there’s one feature that is missing from this game that makes its purchase unjustifiable for me: online play. It also looks like the rest of the games in this series so far are also lacking online play. Without it, I’m probably not going to buy any of them, even if these are great renditions of great board games. Especially at the price they’re currently being sold for.

This is especially head-scratching, as you could play Carcassonne online on the Xbox 360 a decade ago. Its exclusion here is simply baffling. Until we get online play in here, I don’t see any reason to buy these versions over the physical board games or the much-cheaper-and-probably-just-as-good mobile ports.



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